Action from the 370th Anniversary of the Battle of Nantwich during the English Civil War performed by the sealed knot

Today (23rd October) marks the anniversary of the Battle of Edgehill. This past weekend we re-enacted the battle (photos to come). The Above picture showx the line up of the Parliamentary (red) and Royalist (blue) forces.
Outcome
Both sides held their positions during the night, which was very cold. This has been suggested as the reason why many of the wounded survived, as the cold allowed many wounds to congeal, saving the wounded from bleeding to death or succumbing to infection.
The following day, both armies formed up again, but neither was willing to resume the battle. Charles sent a herald to Essex with a message of pardon if he would agree to the King’s terms, but the messenger was roughly handled and forced to return without delivering his message. Although Essex had been reinforced by some of his units which had lagged behind on the march, he withdrew on 25 October to Warwick Castle, abandoning seven guns on the battlefield.
This allowed the King to move directly on London. Rupert urged this course, and was prepared to undertake it with his cavalry alone. With Essex’s army still intact, Charles chose to move more deliberately, with the whole army. After capturing Banbury on 27 October, Charles advanced via Oxford, Aylesbury and Reading. Essex meanwhile had moved directly to London. Reinforced by the London Trained Bands and many citizen volunteers, his army proved to be too strong for the King to contemplate another battle when the Royalists advanced to Turnham Green. The King withdrew to Oxford, which he made his capital for the rest of the war. With both sides almost evenly matched, it would drag on ruinously for years.
It is generally acknowledged that the Royalist cavalry’s lack of discipline prevented a clear Royalist victory at Edgehill. Not for the last time in the war, they would gallop after fleeing enemy and then break ranks to plunder, rather than rally to attack the enemy infantry. Byron’s and Digby’s men in particular, were not involved in the first clashes and should have been kept in hand rather than allowed to gallop off the battlefield.

Today (23rd October) marks the anniversary of the Battle of Edgehill. This past weekend we re-enacted the battle (photos to come). The Above picture showx the line up of the Parliamentary (red) and Royalist (blue) forces.

Outcome

Both sides held their positions during the night, which was very cold. This has been suggested as the reason why many of the wounded survived, as the cold allowed many wounds to congeal, saving the wounded from bleeding to death or succumbing to infection.

The following day, both armies formed up again, but neither was willing to resume the battle. Charles sent a herald to Essex with a message of pardon if he would agree to the King’s terms, but the messenger was roughly handled and forced to return without delivering his message. Although Essex had been reinforced by some of his units which had lagged behind on the march, he withdrew on 25 October to Warwick Castle, abandoning seven guns on the battlefield.

This allowed the King to move directly on London. Rupert urged this course, and was prepared to undertake it with his cavalry alone. With Essex’s army still intact, Charles chose to move more deliberately, with the whole army. After capturing Banbury on 27 October, Charles advanced via Oxford, Aylesbury and Reading. Essex meanwhile had moved directly to London. Reinforced by the London Trained Bands and many citizen volunteers, his army proved to be too strong for the King to contemplate another battle when the Royalists advanced to Turnham Green. The King withdrew to Oxford, which he made his capital for the rest of the war. With both sides almost evenly matched, it would drag on ruinously for years.

It is generally acknowledged that the Royalist cavalry’s lack of discipline prevented a clear Royalist victory at Edgehill. Not for the last time in the war, they would gallop after fleeing enemy and then break ranks to plunder, rather than rally to attack the enemy infantry. Byron’s and Digby’s men in particular, were not involved in the first clashes and should have been kept in hand rather than allowed to gallop off the battlefield.

Question on todays The Chase got my attention today.

Question on todays The Chase got my attention today.

Zombie Pikemen.

Taken the other year  when we did some filming for an amatuer film maker.

Zombie Pikemen.

Taken the other year  when we did some filming for an amatuer film maker.

Bagots and the Astley’s Brigade v Essex and the London Brigade

Taken at Newstead Abbey on August Bank Holiday

Got my mini armoury on show in my room finally.

Got my mini armoury on show in my room finally.

During the Battle of Edgehill in 1642, The ironically named Sir Faithful Fortescue decided to change sides half way through the battle. Unfortunately, his men forgot to take off their orange sashes, which showed which side they were on. So no sooner had they changed sides than their new allies shot them!

Bagots (in Purple) and Astley’s Brigade getting stuck in at point in the background Kings Guard pike going in at push.
Photo taken this past weekend at Newstead Abbey.

Bagots (in Purple) and Astley’s Brigade getting stuck in at point in the background Kings Guard pike going in at push.

Photo taken this past weekend at Newstead Abbey.

The Beautiful Newstead Abbey plays host to the Sealed Knot August Bank Holiday muster

The Beautiful Newstead Abbey plays host to the Sealed Knot August Bank Holiday muster

Just got home from a fun day at Wentworth Castle near Barnsley (only went today due to working yesterday). Got there an had choice of dummy musket with my own regiment’s brigade or go over to the opposition an do pike with the Essex Regiment due to the fact only 3 of our pike turned up (1 of which was me).

I’ve done dummy musket before and it bored the life out of me so I jumped at the chance to do pike, turns out Essex pike was supposed come up against out Pike and so due to them not being there Essex pike turned to out musket so I ended up going against the other few of our pike who went as dummy musket (typical).

Wentworth such a big impressive place

Wentworth such a big impressive place

Horrible Histories take on the English Civil War

Map of England during the Civil War showing the controlled areas of the Royalists and Parliamentarians.

Map of England during the Civil War showing the controlled areas of the Royalists and Parliamentarians.

The Armour of a Pikeman during the ECW period consisted of:
Helmet, This was an English Morion used to protect the head from blows from an enemy sword, pike or gun shot.
Gorget, Fitted around the neck.
Back & Breast Plates, The main pieces of the set protecting the chest from enemy blows and also the back. 
Tassets, These would attach to the bottom of the Breast plate offering protection to the upper legs, these were often discarded as they were uncomfortable to march many miles in.

The Armour of a Pikeman during the ECW period consisted of:

Helmet, This was an English Morion used to protect the head from blows from an enemy sword, pike or gun shot.

Gorget, Fitted around the neck.

Back & Breast Plates, The main pieces of the set protecting the chest from enemy blows and also the back.

Tassets, These would attach to the bottom of the Breast plate offering protection to the upper legs, these were often discarded as they were uncomfortable to march many miles in.